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Walk

Miki’s Historical Road
The road connecting western Japan with Kyoto passes through Miki and has been used by many travelers since ancient times. Traveling east towards Kyoto, this road takes you to the famous hot springs of Arima and the road is often referred to as Yu-no-yama kaido or Hot Spring Mountain Road.
Today, many machiya houses remain displaying traditional architectural features including udatsu style buildings, lattice doors, muskikomado windows and koshiyane doubled roofs. In February 2002, the Ministry of Culture designated the former Tamaoki Residence as a tangible cultural property (see Izayoi Diary Memoirs).
The Battle of Miki
Paintings at Hokai Temple depict the story of this battle, which began in 1578 and ended in 1580. The battle is known as Miki no higoroshi after Toyotomi’s strategy that blocked the supply of weapons and food to Miki Castle eventually forcing Lord Bessho to take the lives of himself and his family.

Tomb of Takenaka Hanbei

The Ruins of Miki Castle

Historical Forest Park

Hokai-ji Temple

Jigen-ji Temple

Unryu-ji Temple
Miki’s Historical District
The area of Miki was known in ancient times as Minagi and was noted in 713 AD in the Harima Fudoki.

Shobo-ji Park - Ancient Tomb Mounds

Shijimi-no-Iwamuro-Cave

Gaya-in Temple

Sentai-Jizo (1,000 Jizo)

Misaka Syphon Bridge

Izayoi Diary Memoirs
Fujiwara Teika is a famous Kamakura poet who selected the works for the great anthology of poems known as the Shinkokin Wakashu. He owned and wrote about the Hosokawa Estate in Miki, in his diary Meigetsuki. When Tameie, Teika’s son passed away, Tamaeie sons’ Tameuji and Tamesuke of different mothers, fought over the inheritance of the estate. Tamesuke’s mother Abutsuni, travelled to Kamakura to sue Tameuji. After winning her case, the Hosokawa Estate became the property of the Reizei Family, which Tamesuke established and carried into the 16th Century by Masatame. The colorful history of the estate is recorded in the Izayoi Diary.

Birthplace of Seika Fujiwara

Renge-ji Temple

Wakigawa-no-nenbutsu-sui-Spring